Posts tagged research

3 Notes

Thank god the embarrassing and painful Brazilian wax era is at an end. In a report supported by UKMedix.com, 1,870 women in the United Kingdom were asked if they style or groom their bikini areas. The results were 49 percent said yes and 51 percent said no. The women polled were between 18 and 30.

Thank Jesus, Pubes Are Officially Back! | Nerve.com

1 Notes

Are You Part Of The “Pull Out Generation?” | The Kinsey Institute

The withdrawal or “pull out” method of contraception is used in heterosexual sexual intercourse to avoid unwanted pregnancy.  As the oldest form of birth control, it has been shown to be only slightly less effective than condoms, but it continues to be debated on its practice and effectiveness.

Are You Part Of The “Pull Out Generation?” | The Kinsey Institute

The withdrawal or “pull out” method of contraception is used in heterosexual sexual intercourse to avoid unwanted pregnancy.  As the oldest form of birth control, it has been shown to be only slightly less effective than condoms, but it continues to be debated on its practice and effectiveness.

1 Notes

More State Abortion Restrictions Were Enacted in 2011–2013 Than in the Entire Previous Decade

Via Guttmacher Institute:

Reproductive health and rights were once again the subject of extensive debate in state capitols in 2013. Over the course of the year, 39 states enacted 141 provisions related to reproductive health and rights. Half of these new provisions, 70 in 22 states, sought to restrict access to abortion services.

In sharp contrast to this barrage of abortion restrictions, a handful of states adopted measures designed to expand access to reproductive health services. Most notably, California enacted the first new state law in more than seven years designed to expand access to abortion, and five states adopted measures to expand access to comprehensive sex education, facilitate access to emergency contraception for women who have been sexually assaulted and enable patients’ partners to obtain STI treatment. (See Guttmacher’s full 2013 analysis here.)

12 Notes

Penis Size By State | BuzzFeed



See how male endowment varies across all 50 states.
Top Five: 5. Arizona, 4. Indiana, 3. New York, 2. Oregon, 1. New Hampshire



Related: Condom maker breaks down penis size by state, city

Penis Size By State | BuzzFeed

See how male endowment varies across all 50 states.

Top Five: 5. Arizona, 4. Indiana, 3. New York, 2. Oregon, 1. New Hampshire

Related: Condom maker breaks down penis size by state, city

4 Notes

The Pill tied to lower ovarian cancer risk | Reuters

Women who use birth control pills are less likely to develop ovarian cancer later in life, a new analysis of past studies suggests.
Researchers pooled data from 24 studies and found Pill users had a 27 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with ovarian cancer. And longer use seemed to be tied to more protection.

The Pill tied to lower ovarian cancer risk | Reuters

Women who use birth control pills are less likely to develop ovarian cancer later in life, a new analysis of past studies suggests.

Researchers pooled data from 24 studies and found Pill users had a 27 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with ovarian cancer. And longer use seemed to be tied to more protection.

2 Notes

Annual, Schmanual: Why You May Not Need The Gyno On The Regular | Refinery29

Well, this is interesting: Hands up if your idea of intimacy doesn’t include stirrups and latex gloves — yeah, we know. But, while we prefer to keep the word “annual” to our gardening jargon, the yearly exam is a must-discuss when it comes to gyno health. So, you can imagine our delight when we found this interesting tidbit from Jezebel: Apparently, the annual pelvic exam, dubbed the “bimanual,” may not be as necessary as we thought. Annual pelvic exams are typically used to screen for possibly cancerous changes and STIs (STDs for all you ’90s kids). But, according to more and more doctors, a simple pee-in-cup and swabbing exercise is as effective, and significantly less invasive. The exams also increase the cost of medical care and aren’ttotally medically necessary if you’re not symptomatic. Besides, abnormal results often cause alarm when there isn’t any real reason for concern, leading to equally unnecessary surgeries and subsequent complications.Jezebel cites all kinds of big-name studies and organizations that not only say bimanuals are unnecessary, but that they may be part of the reason why U.S. rates of ovarian cystectomy and hysterectomy are more than double that of European countries, where pelvic exams are given only to symptomatic women. However, it’s important to note that women still need to go for an annual exam to get a prescription for birth control, which is frustrating if those exams aren’t helping you otherwise. This case is obviously not as black-and-white as whether pelvic exams should remain a regular service, but the article certainly sheds some light on a routine that may one day become obsolete. We’re choosing to put some faith in these findings. Because “Now you’re going to feel a little pressure” may be the grossest understatement of all time. (Jezebel)

Annual, Schmanual: Why You May Not Need The Gyno On The Regular | Refinery29

Well, this is interesting: Hands up if your idea of intimacy doesn’t include stirrups and latex gloves — yeah, we know. But, while we prefer to keep the word “annual” to our gardening jargon, the yearly exam is a must-discuss when it comes to gyno health. So, you can imagine our delight when we found this interesting tidbit from Jezebel: Apparently, the annual pelvic exam, dubbed the “bimanual,” may not be as necessary as we thought. 

Annual pelvic exams are typically used to screen for possibly cancerous changes and STIs (STDs for all you ’90s kids). But, according to more and more doctors, a simple pee-in-cup and swabbing exercise is as effective, and significantly less invasive. The exams also increase the cost of medical care and aren’ttotally medically necessary if you’re not symptomatic. Besides, abnormal results often cause alarm when there isn’t any real reason for concern, leading to equally unnecessary surgeries and subsequent complications.

Jezebel cites all kinds of big-name studies and organizations that not only say bimanuals are unnecessary, but that they may be part of the reason why U.S. rates of ovarian cystectomy and hysterectomy are more than double that of European countries, where pelvic exams are given only to symptomatic women. However, it’s important to note that women still need to go for an annual exam to get a prescription for birth control, which is frustrating if those exams aren’t helping you otherwise. 

This case is obviously not as black-and-white as whether pelvic exams should remain a regular service, but the article certainly sheds some light on a routine that may one day become obsolete. We’re choosing to put some faith in these findings. Because “Now you’re going to feel a little pressure” may be the grossest understatement of all time. (Jezebel)

2 Notes

amiright?

amiright?

1 Notes

Size indeed matters, suggests male attractiveness study | USA Today

"What does a woman want?" asked Freud. A guy who is tall and well-endowed, suggests an Australian study that used male cut-outs to ask the question.

Thanks to our pal @bwrecka for bringing this gem to us. Send along your quality linkables on Tumblr or @ us on the Twitter. #ladieslovelinks

Size indeed matters, suggests male attractiveness study | USA Today

"What does a woman want?" asked Freud. A guy who is tall and well-endowed, suggests an Australian study that used male cut-outs to ask the question.

Thanks to our pal @bwrecka for bringing this gem to us. Send along your quality linkables on Tumblr or @ us on the Twitter. #ladieslovelinks

1 Notes

1 Notes

Women Overestimate How Effective Most Forms of Contraception Really Are | The Psychology of Human Sexuality

Results indicated that only 2 in 5 women correctly guessed the effectiveness of condoms, and fewer than 1 in 5 correctly guess the effectiveness of contraceptive pills, patches, and rings. The majority of women (nearly two-thirds) overestimated how effective each of these methods were at preventing pregnancy.

Women Overestimate How Effective Most Forms of Contraception Really Are | The Psychology of Human Sexuality

Results indicated that only 2 in 5 women correctly guessed the effectiveness of condoms, and fewer than 1 in 5 correctly guess the effectiveness of contraceptive pills, patches, and rings. The majority of women (nearly two-thirds) overestimated how effective each of these methods were at preventing pregnancy.

62 Notes

2 Notes

Is It True What They Say About Men With Big Feet? | Slate


Urologists at an English hospital in 2002 measured the length of 104 men’s penises and recorded their shoe sizes, finding no statistically significant correlation between the two. The study was an instant hit, and several websites declared the penis length–shoe size myth officially debunked. The Explainer, however, isn’t entirely convinced. A 1993 study observed a relationship between shoe size and penis length, albeit a weak one. A couple of other studies documented correlations between penis length and other body measurements. Turkish researchers in 2011 found that height, weight, and body mass index values all correlated with penis size. The same year that the English study claimed to bust the shoe-size myth, Greek urologists observed a relationship between penis length and the length of one’s index finger. If the size of other body parts correlates with penis length, it would be surprising if shoe size did not. (Tall people with big hands, after all, are likely to have big feet.) Individual variation is to be expected, but this question may remain unsettled until a series of well-constructed studies reach the same conclusion. That might be a while, given the paucity of federal research dollars earmarked for penis-length studies.
The difficulty in these studies is finding an accurate, reliable method for measuring a penis. Body dimensions, in general, are subject to change. Standing up for long periods, exercise, andsitting through a trans-Atlantic flight can cause your feet to swell. Waist circumference alsochanges throughout the day, as does height. These variations, however, are insignificant compared with the way a penis shrinks and lengthens in response to temperature changes, physical activity, touch, and mental state. According to the aforementioned Turkish study, simply stretching out a flaccid penis changes its length by more than 30 percent.

Is It True What They Say About Men With Big Feet? | Slate

Urologists at an English hospital in 2002 measured the length of 104 men’s penises and recorded their shoe sizes, finding no statistically significant correlation between the two. The study was an instant hit, and several websites declared the penis length–shoe size myth officially debunked. The Explainer, however, isn’t entirely convinced. A 1993 study observed a relationship between shoe size and penis length, albeit a weak one. A couple of other studies documented correlations between penis length and other body measurements. Turkish researchers in 2011 found that height, weight, and body mass index values all correlated with penis size. The same year that the English study claimed to bust the shoe-size myth, Greek urologists observed a relationship between penis length and the length of one’s index finger. If the size of other body parts correlates with penis length, it would be surprising if shoe size did not. (Tall people with big hands, after all, are likely to have big feet.) Individual variation is to be expected, but this question may remain unsettled until a series of well-constructed studies reach the same conclusion. That might be a while, given the paucity of federal research dollars earmarked for penis-length studies.

The difficulty in these studies is finding an accurate, reliable method for measuring a penis. Body dimensions, in general, are subject to change. Standing up for long periods, exercise, andsitting through a trans-Atlantic flight can cause your feet to swell. Waist circumference alsochanges throughout the day, as does height. These variations, however, are insignificant compared with the way a penis shrinks and lengthens in response to temperature changes, physical activity, touch, and mental state. According to the aforementioned Turkish study, simply stretching out a flaccid penis changes its length by more than 30 percent.

Notes

What's happening in your state for the education of HIV & sex? | Guttmacher Institute

Beginning in the 1970s, concerns over AIDS and teen pregnancy galvanized widespread public support for sex education in schools. Most states today have a policy requiring HIV education, usually in conjunction with broader sex education. Meanwhile, as debate over the relative merits of abstinence-only-until- marriage versus more comprehensive approaches has intensified, states have enacted a number of specific content requirements. This brief summarizes state-level sex and HIV education policies, as well as specific content requirements, based on a review of state laws, regulations and other legally binding policies. (Guttmacher Institute)

6 Notes

HPV Costs Americans Nearly $2 Billion To Treat. Why Is It So Expensive? | Slate



According to a new study just released by the CDC, Americans contracted 20 million new sexually transmitted infections in 2008, and treating them will cost U.S. patients and insurance companies $15.6 billion over the course of the infections. After HIV—which will cost a projected $12.6 billion to treat—HPV is the most expensive STI to manage, running us a collective bill of $1.7 billion.


Most strains of HPV clear from the body safely within a couple of years. A handful of more dangerous strains, which cause cervical cancer and genital warts, are preventable by vaccine. Routine check-ups catch aggressive forms of the virus early. So why does it cost so much to treat HPV? Part of it is the sheer will of the virus—HPV is the most common of those 20 million STIs. But it’s also because, as costly as treatment is, prevention isn’t cheap, either.


In 2010, only 30 percent of American girls had received all three CDC-recommended doses of the HPV vaccine, according to a recent report from the National Cancer Institute. That sets us behind Canada, where between 50-85 percent of girls are vaccinated, and the United Kingdom and Australia, where over 70 percent of girls have completed the vaccine schedule. It’s tempting to chalk this up to all-American prudishness over the idea of inoculating 12-year-old girls against STIs. But according to the report, the U.S. health care system is to blame. The main barriers to vaccination are inadequate provider recommendations, a broken reminder system for urging patients to complete their doses, and concerns over cost and insurance coverage. Vaccination rates are lowest among girls living below the poverty line. And when those girls become women, they make up a disproportionate number of cervical cancer cases.

HPV Costs Americans Nearly $2 Billion To Treat. Why Is It So Expensive? | Slate

According to a new study just released by the CDC, Americans contracted 20 million new sexually transmitted infections in 2008, and treating them will cost U.S. patients and insurance companies $15.6 billion over the course of the infections. After HIV—which will cost a projected $12.6 billion to treat—HPV is the most expensive STI to manage, running us a collective bill of $1.7 billion.

Most strains of HPV clear from the body safely within a couple of years. A handful of more dangerous strains, which cause cervical cancer and genital warts, are preventable by vaccine. Routine check-ups catch aggressive forms of the virus early. So why does it cost so much to treat HPV? Part of it is the sheer will of the virus—HPV is the most common of those 20 million STIs. But it’s also because, as costly as treatment is, prevention isn’t cheap, either.

In 2010, only 30 percent of American girls had received all three CDC-recommended doses of the HPV vaccine, according to a recent report from the National Cancer Institute. That sets us behind Canada, where between 50-85 percent of girls are vaccinated, and the United Kingdom and Australia, where over 70 percent of girls have completed the vaccine schedule. It’s tempting to chalk this up to all-American prudishness over the idea of inoculating 12-year-old girls against STIs. But according to the report, the U.S. health care system is to blame. The main barriers to vaccination are inadequate provider recommendations, a broken reminder system for urging patients to complete their doses, and concerns over cost and insurance coverage. Vaccination rates are lowest among girls living below the poverty line. And when those girls become women, they make up a disproportionate number of cervical cancer cases.

Notes

Morning-after pill use up to 1 in 9 younger women

Via Associated Press:

About 1 in 9 younger women have used the morning-after pill after sex, according to the first government report to focus on emergency contraception since its approval 15 years ago.

The results come from a survey of females ages 15 to 44. Eleven percent of those who’d had sex reported using a morning-after pill. That’s up from 4 percent in 2002, only a few years after the pills went on the market and adults still needed a prescription.

The increased popularity is probably because it is easier to get now and because of media coverage of controversial efforts to lift the age limit for over-the-counter sales, experts said. A prescription is still required for those younger than 17 so it is still sold from behind pharmacy counters.

In the study, half the women who used the pills said they did it because they’d had unprotected sex. Most of the rest cited a broken condom or worries that the birth control method they used had failed.

White women and more educated women use it the most, the research showed. That’s not surprising, said James Trussell, a Princeton University researcher who’s studied the subject.

"I don’t think you can go to college in the United States and not know about emergency contraception," said Trussell, who has promoted its use and started a hot line.

One Pennsylvania college even has a vending machine dispensing the pills.

The morning-after pill is basically a high-dose version of birth control pills. It prevents ovulation and needs to be taken within a few days after sex. The morning-after pill is different from the so-called abortion pill, which is designed to terminate a pregnancy.

At least five versions of the morning-after pills are sold in the United States. They cost around $35 to $60 a dose at a pharmacy, depending on the brand.

Since it is sold over-the-counter, insurers generally only pay for it with a doctor’s prescription. The new Affordable Care Act promises to cover morning-after pills, meaning no co-pays, but again only with a prescription.

The results of the study were released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s based on in-person interviews of more than 12,000 women in 2006 through 2010. It was the agency’s first in-depth report on that issue, said Kimberly Daniels, the study’s lead author.

The study also found:

-Among different age groups, women in their early 20s were more likely to have taken a morning-after pill. About 1 in 4 did.

-About 1 in 5 never-married women had taken a morning-after pill, compared to just 1 in 20 married women.

-Of the women who used the pill, 59 percent said they had done it only once, 24 percent said twice, and 17 percent said three or more times.

A woman who uses emergency contraception multiple times “needs to be thinking about a more regular form” of birth control, noted Lawrence Finer, director of domestic research for the Guttmacher Institute, a nonprofit group that does research on reproductive health.

Also on Thursday, the CDC released a report on overall contraception use. Among its many findings, 99 percent of women who’ve had sex used some sort of birth control. That includes 82 percent who used birth control pills and 93 percent whose partner had used a condom.